July 21, 2019

Keep Your Personal Strength Alive by Laurie Miller

After a health crisis hits, after the shock of the diagnosis and the meetings with your doctors, hope and desire to overcome the illness is strong. Your loved ones and friends are supportive and positive. Hope is a powerful thing and is necessary in managing to maintain a positive outlook.

Personal strength – physical, mental and emotional – allows you to handle the rocky road and the ups and downs that are inevitably part of a health crisis. Personal strength comes from many sources and your belief system (spiritual, religious, or about life in general) plays an important role. Mental and emotional strength, in particular, come from the messages you send yourself and the choices you make. If your upbringing included messages like “you can do anything you set your mind to” or “you are capable of creating your positive outcomes,” those messages become the solid base of that gives you strength.

It is easy during a health crisis to take on a “poor me” attitude or feel like a victim. Some of this is normal, but too much weakens your personal strength and personal power. When you find yourself in this negative state, notice it, feel it, experience it, explore it . . . and then release it. “Poor me” may seem protective as it enables you to stay stuck and not really deal with the emotions that come with health crisis such as fear or make necessary but difficult changes.  However, in the long term this attitude only serves to bring you down and lessen your quality of life.

Physical strength can be built back after chemotherapy, radiation, or other medical treatments. Give your body good foods, nutrients, and supplements to strengthen it. Drink plenty of water and exercise within your capacity to enhance physical stamina and strength. When you feel physically strong, mental and emotional strength follow and likewise when you are emotionally and mentally strong and resilient, you have more physical resources.

So, if you are in a space where you need strength, take a deep breath and feel a surge of oxygen entering your body and giving you life force energy. Do it again and you will feel even better, lighter, and more comfortable. When I find myself feeling down, I say, “Hello down (or sadness or fear or whatever the emotion may be). I am aware of you.” Staying stuck in that negative place feels icky so I make a conscious decision to shift my mental, emotional, physical state and it works! I feel better, I smile, and I thrive!

Taking your mind away from the details of the health crisis to pleasure, fantasy, and enjoyable stimuli also helps shift you out of a negative state and build your strength. It is important to engage in activities that enhance your quality of life such as reading, attending movies and concerts, and getting plenty of laughter. Set aside the health crisis and all the decisions, questions, and concerns for a period of time. Listen to music, a hypnosis CD, or something else that brings you pleasure and relaxation. When you do this your body relaxes, your emotions calm, and your mind quiets. This restores the inner strength and personal power that keeps you going, keeps you positive, and keeps you motivated to live well even in the midst of a health challenge.

Laurie Miller is a Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with more than 30 years of experience helping people achieve health and happiness.  Laurie can use her training and her experience with illness to help you.  Read her articles for free here. Purchase her prerecorded hypnosis sessions at http://www.hypnosisconcepts.com/cds-and-mp3s/.

2013 Health Trends to Watch by Rachael Roehmholdt

In 2012, you couldn’t read a health-related publication without running across some mention of getting enough sleep at night, the dangerous rise of energy drinks, or how so many women are eating a gluten-free diet – for allergies, sensitivities, or as a weight loss solution.

2013 will usher in a whole new set of trends that will return us back to basics - natural products, tuning in to your body, and being active wherever you go. Let’s take a look at five of these trends that might make their way into your life this year.

On-the-go fitness.
With so many of us using mobile phones and tablets, we’ll continue to see a rise of fitness and health apps to get that workout in wherever you go. We’ll also see a lot more membership based fitness apps (like GaiamTV.com) that you can access wherever you have an internet connection so you can get your sweat on from anywhere.

Love your body at any size.
With the rise of more celebrities embracing their bodies, we’ll see more women taking this to heart as well. As a culture, we’re shifting from the idea that one body size is the right size and seeing that all shapes and sizes have the ability to be healthy.

Personalize your fitness and health programs.
Understanding that no two people are alike, more personalized and custom health and fitness programs will emerge for women. More women will work one-on-one with certified professionals to motivate them to success by creating programs that work best for their bodies and where they’re at in life.

Go au natural.
In 2013, we’ll continue to see more natural and sustainable beauty products hitting the shelves. Many established brands will likely branch out with new lines of makeup, creams, lotions and potions that come from nature and aren’t made with harsh chemicals.

Tune in to your body.
We’ve seen many food allergies, intolerances and sensitivities pop up in recent years, which means women are becoming much more aware of how foods affect them. With that in mind, we’ll see new allergen-friendly brands pop up, as well as established brands work to keep their customers happy with these options.

Many of these trends in women’s health are tried and true, so you can be sure that the ones you choose to participate in will be here to stay well past 2013.

Rachael Roehmholdt is a certified holistic health coach and founder of Be More Healthful. With a passion for good food and living a healthful and balanced life, she believes that small changes to our everyday lives can set us up for a lifetime of health and happiness.