November 20, 2017

Want to start running?

Get Fit Quick Tip:

Walk/Run Intervals!

Want to start running, but don’t know where or how to begin? Walk/run intervals make the transition manageable. A common mistake is doing too much too soon. Here’s how to progress gradually reducing risk of injury and burnout:

Once you have a regular walking program 3 days a week, begin with 10 second intervals in the middle of your workout. Warm up for 8-10 minutes, perform a series of 10 second jogging or running intervals followed by 30 second or more walking intervals. Conclude your workout with a 5-10 minute cool down. Gradually, add seconds and then minutes to your jogging/running intervals and decrease your walking intervals.

 

*Consult your physician before performing exercise.

 

Lunge Stretch for Runners

Get Fit Quick Tip:

Lunge Stretch for Runners

Stretch your leg muscles with this Lunge Stretch: Begin kneeling on your right knee, with your left foot forward and flat. Place one hand on the floor on either side of your body for support, or place your hands on your hips. Let both hips fall forward, feeling a slight stretch in the front of your right hip and thigh. For more of a stretch lift your right knee up about two-three inches off of the floor. Hold for 10-30 seconds, then release. Repeat the stretch kneeling on your left knee, and your right foot forward and flat.

 

*Consult your physician before performing exercise.

Stretch for Runners

Get Fit Quick Tip:

Standing Inner Thigh and Hamstring Stretch

Do this stretch for runners after your next workout. Begin standing and pull your right foot up in front of your belly button. Move your right knee to the side of your body. Hold your lower leg and ankle with both hands, keeping  your lower leg parallel to the floor. Keep your torso straight and shoulders back. Hold for 10-30 seconds, then release. Repeat pulling your left foot up in front of your body. Using both hands hold your left calf and ankle, letting your knee fall to the side. Hold for 10-30 seconds, then release.

 

*Consult your physician before beginning exercise. This stretch is for those without injury concerns.

 

 

Interested in Running?

Get Fit Quick Tip:

Start a Running Program!

So you’re interested in running to help your fitness? A common mistake of many beginning runners is doing too much too soon. Here’s how to get started effectively and safely:

 

Start with walk/jog intervals. Perform a walking warm up for 10 minutes, then start with 3-5, 10-30 second jogging intervals followed by 1-2 minute walking recovery intervals, complete your workout with a 10 minute walking cool down.

Wear running shoes. Go to your local sporting goods store and ask about running-specific shoes. Proper footwear is essential with high-impact fitness.

Listen to your body. When beginning a running program, listen to your body and level of soreness. Muscle aches are okay when starting new exercise, consistent pain is not.

 

*Consult your physician before beginning exercise.

Try Running!

Get Fit Quick Tip:

Try Running!

Running is an effective total body workout. With one exercise you’ll strengthen your cardiovascular system, as well as your muscle endurance.

Here’s how to start:

Incorporate running or jogging into your day. If you’re out taking the dog for a walk, add in a few 10-30 second jogging intervals. Watching your child’s sports baseball? Do running intervals around a neighboring field.

Hit the trails. Running on dirt provides a unique experience. If you appreciate the quiet and prefer to not navigate around cars, take your jogging or running workout off the road. Start with running intervals according to terrain.

Head to the hills. Neighborhood hills with little traffic work well for a focused jogging or running workout. Begin by performing running intervals uphill and then walk down the hill.

Treadmills work. Love them or hate them, treadmills provide a workout opportunity regardless of weather, time of day or ability. Choose your speed, choose your duration and go.

*Always consult your physician before beginning exercise.

 

Marathon: The Insider Scoop Written by Kristie Cranford

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Marathon: The Insider Scoop Written by Kristie Cranford
 

A marathon is not only a physical feat, but a mental one. The best way to have a great race is not just to train, but to prepare.

 

Train within your ability. There are a numerous training plans available.  Find one that fits you.  Don’t be afraid to consult with a Coach.  No matter your ability, it never hurts to have a professional help you along the way.

Train at race time. Plan your long runs the same time and same day of the week as your race. Your body has a memory and will learn to run the distance at that time.

Experiment. Try energy gels, sports drinks, try it all. Get it down to a science and find out what works for you.  Train with what sports drink and energy gels will be provided at the aid stations on the race course. If while experimenting you find they do not work for you, plan a way to carry your own.

Train for the course. If it is a hilly course, don’t do all your training on flat surfaces. Even better if you can train on the actual race course. 

18 Mile training runs will drive you batty. Ask anyone. 17 miles, 19 miles, even 22 miles, no problem.  18 will drive you bonkers.  Just accept it, tackle it and run 18.1 if you have to.

Have a dress rehearsal. On a training run wear what you plan to wear in the race, fuel and hydrate like you plan to race day. If something isn’t right, you’ll have time to make changes before race day.

You will go crazy. There will be a time when your training tapers down that you will experience what has been called: Taper Madness, Taper Crazies, or Taper Tantrums.  Whatever you call it, all your nervous pent up energy will make you a little looney and edgy to say the least. Having a good friend to talk to will really help during this time. 

Carb load does not equal a car load of food. While experimenting, you should have figured out your best meal for the night before a long run.  Eat what you know is tried and true the night before the race. You do not want to be searching for a porta potty on the race course like a heat seeking missile.

It’s code. Call it superstition, or an unwritten rule, NEVER wear the race shirt in the race.

Relax. Race day you know what to do. You’ve trained, experimented, prepared. So relax and enjoy the marathon. When you’ve finished put on that race shirt, slap a 26.2 sticker on your car, and wear your medal with pride. You ARE a marathoner.

This article is written by Kristie Cranford, CPT. A wife, mother, cancer survivor and competitive athlete, Kristie is an ACE Certified Personal Trainer as well as a Running/Triathlon Coach for PRSFit Nation. Living in Las Vegas, she is the Chair of Long Distance Running for USATF-Nevada Association, Coolibar sponsored athlete, and Raw Elements Sunscreen Ambassador. Contact information:
Email: CoachKristieLV@yahoo.com, www.prsfit.com, http://coachkristie.com

Being Run Ready by Dr. Kent Sasse

It is the time of year when the temperature encourages people to lace up their sneakers and every weekend boasts a run (or two.) Planning to run a marathon, half marathon, or even a 10K requires training and proper maintenance for your body. For beginners it is especially important to begin a regimen and educate yourself on best habits.

Listen to your body. It is not how fast you run today, or even how far; it is about how many years you can enjoy running. For older runners or those with injuries, don’t run if it hurts. Give your body a chance to heal. Take advantage of the days you feel good and go on longer runs, push yourself, and seize the opportunity.

Run with a partner that can encourage and motivate you. Training with others with a similar interest and passion for running means you can train for events together, swap training techniques, engage in a little friendly competition or maybe even participate in a relay as team.

Hydration. Water is obviously integral to successful and healthy running, but even more so in extreme conditions of heat and altitude. Hydrate before your runs by drinking water right before, hours before, and even days before. You will recognize hydration by (almost) colorless urine. Drink water consistently rather than consuming more than 16 oz. before a run itself. Drinking enormous amounts of water prior to a run can cause issues so hydrate often rather than in huge doses. If water stops are not on your runs- and even if they are- supplement with a water belt.

Food Intake. Eat your normal balanced breakfast a couple hours before a strenuous run; normalcy is easier for your body to digest. Stay away from heavy meals, and opt for oatmeal and bagels and bananas. Don’t forget a dose of protein as well to keep those muscles happy.

Dr. Sasse founded Western Bariatric Institute and iMetabolic. He is also the author of numerous books and a featured speaker nationally in the field of weight loss.