January 21, 2019

Isometric Ab Challenge

Get Fit Quick Tip:

Isometric Abs!

Isometrics hold muscles under tension for a set period of time. Try this V-Sit for an isometric abdominal challenge. Here’s how:

Sit on the floor in proper spinal alignment. Pull your belly button in and keep your shoulders back and down. Extend both legs straight out on the floor in front of you. With a straight back, lean back slightly and lift both legs up off the floor about 6 inches to start. Extend both arms straight out in front of you. Hold this position for 10 seconds, breathing in your natural rhythm. Lower your legs and rest. Repeat 2-5 times.

 

*Consult your physician before performing exercise. This exercise is for intermediate/advanced exercises, and is not for those with injury concerns.

High Knees Cardio

Get Fit Quick Tip:

High Knees for Cardio!

If you’re looking to add a cardio component to your workout, consider High Knees. Great for runners, walkers and those looking for fast calorie burning, high knees provide a challenging and energizing interval option.

Begin standing. Lift your right knee straight up, adding a hop to the top of the range of motion if desired. Immediately return your right foot to the floor, and lift your left knee straight up, adding a hop to the top of the range of motion. Begin with a ten second interval and build from there. This exercise is for intermediate or advanced exercisers, without injury or illness concerns.

 

*Consult your physician before beginning exercise.

FUN Fitness!

Get Fit Quick Tip:

Find the FUN!

Having fun with your fitness, means you’ll want to workout! A consistent workout is where results happen. Let loose, explore and experiment, be open to not exactly knowing what comes next. Here’s how to have fun with your fitness:

Be vulnerable. Take a chance on a workout, where you don’t know exactly how it will go. Do something different!

Be a beginner. Not all workouts need to be about 100% mastery the first time. Try something new!

Abandon structure. Play, run, jump, skip, dance!

 

 

Take your fitness All-Out!

Get Fit Quick Tip:

Go All-Out!

When was the last time you experienced true muscle fatigue in your fitness plan? True muscular fatigue means you’re working to your max. Choosing a workout that requires your maximum physical effort and full mental attention keeps motivation high. It’s also a great method to assess your fitness abilities and progress. Experiment with different workouts once a week or once a month to see what requires 100% of your body and your mind. You may even find a new sport to love!

 

 

Weight Training Works!

Get Fit Quick Tip:

Weight Training Works!

You lift weights every week in the form of groceries, your children, your dining room chair, the bag of dog food, various items in and out of your car. Want to make your daily tasks easier? Start a weight training program. Lifting and carrying are required daily actions that can be completed with less effort by logging a strength workout as little as 2 days each week. Consult a Fitness Professional to outline a program specifically for you, as well as learn proper form and technique. Here are few other benefits of a weight training program you may not have thought of:

Shape your muscles. Muscles give your body shape and contour. You’ll look fit.

Builds independence and confidence. You’ll easily be able to lift and carry what you need, when you need without having to wait for assistance.

Decrease stress. If you’ve had a long stressful day, you’ll leave the muscle and mind tension in every repetitions and set. The result is a relaxed and total-body tension free you.

Improves body awareness. General awareness of posture and alignment will improve, especially if you’re working with free-weights, as you have to stabilize your body on every set.

 

*Consult your physician before beginning exercise.

 

Try Running!

Get Fit Quick Tip:

Try Running!

Running is an effective total body workout. With one exercise you’ll strengthen your cardiovascular system, as well as your muscle endurance.

Here’s how to start:

Incorporate running or jogging into your day. If you’re out taking the dog for a walk, add in a few 10-30 second jogging intervals. Watching your child’s sports baseball? Do running intervals around a neighboring field.

Hit the trails. Running on dirt provides a unique experience. If you appreciate the quiet and prefer to not navigate around cars, take your jogging or running workout off the road. Start with running intervals according to terrain.

Head to the hills. Neighborhood hills with little traffic work well for a focused jogging or running workout. Begin by performing running intervals uphill and then walk down the hill.

Treadmills work. Love them or hate them, treadmills provide a workout opportunity regardless of weather, time of day or ability. Choose your speed, choose your duration and go.

*Always consult your physician before beginning exercise.

 

Expand your Fitness Horizons

Get Fit Quick Tip:

Try new exercises on a regular basis!

Our body (and our mind) likes unaccustomed exercise! Expand your fitness horizons by trying new exercises every 4-6 weeks. Here are 3 ideas to get you started:

Ask your friends what physical activities they enjoy. Tag along!

Revisit your childhood activities. Did you love a particular sport or physical fitness activity growing up? Try it again.

Research. Google search sports and fitness for your home town and see what activities pop up.

 

 

 

 

What’s the BEST workout? By Jennifer Austin

Question: What is the best workout? Answer: The workout you’ll do! The list of possible exercise is endless. Choosing what to do for exercise is really very simple: Go back to the basics of finding what you enjoy. If you enjoy what you’re doing, you’ll want to be doing it! And when you want to be doing an activity, you’ll increase your effort. Effort is where results happen. Design your exercise according to an activity you enjoy.

Ask yourself the following five questions:

Does the activity fill you with ease?
Do you look forward to this activity?
Do you feel physically, psychologically and emotionally better after?
Do you miss the activity when you’re away from it?
Does the activity feel natural and comfortable (doesn’t feel painful) in your body?

Find what activity promotes a “yes” answer to the previous questions, and that’s where you should begin. Here are a few ideas for common activities with fitness-focused progressions to get you started:

If you like to walk, take one day a week and extend your walk to slightly longer than your usual duration. A great way to make your walk longer is to plan for a destination walk. Head to a different neighborhood and explore, for example. You’ll be distracted by new surroundings you’ll hardly notice the longer time spent walking. Adding on in 5 minutes increments is a good way to build fitness into your walk. Build on from there to create an unaccustomed effect on your body.

If you like to ride your bike, think about organizing a work or neighborhood bike club to prepare for an organized ride. Gathering a group of friends together at a set time and place each week to prepare for a ride will add consistency into your bike schedule. Riding with others is also a great way to learn new techniques and bike handling skills to make riding more effective. Combining bike riding with a task is also a great way to make use of the time that would otherwise spend sitting in your car. For example, have to drop something off at a friend’s house, ride your bike there! Have to pick up something small at the store, hop on your bike.

If you like to jog, try adding in a few sprint intervals. If you’re used to jogging the same loop, the same speed the same days of the week, your results probably ceased awhile ago. Adding in sprints increases intensity, which is great for burning calories. Sprint to a landmark on your route or sprint according to your watch. Finding hills to jog also makes for a great muscle loading workout.

Designing your exercise around what you love to do is a great start toward fitness. Most important when just starting out, is not always what you’re doing but that you are in fact, doing something to challenge your heart, lungs and muscles!

The Benefits of Diversified Training

Any form of repetition can cause someone to burn out. This remains true for running, biking, swimming, or any form of exercise. It can be easy for someone to get caught in a repetitious pattern, as many people are drawn to activities that are convenient. Running can be especially repetitive, you need to figure out how to switch up the routine to keep yourself interested and excited. You may have a scenic three mile loop right outside your front door, it easy to maintain your running schedule, so you run it all the time. Or, maybe you hate to run outdoors and you own a treadmill that you run on for an hour each day.
So, listen up runners, I’m speaking to you: Do you automatically roll out of bed, lace up the shoes and head out for the obligatory three-mile loop or jump on the treadmill? Are you still as enamored with it as the first time you ran it? I bet not. Has your running routine become a chore or a necessary evil?  You have the power to get out of your repetitious rut and mix up the run. As a runner, not only should you try new locations, but you should also try new surfaces and incorporate new techniques.  Better yet, throw in some cross-training as well to switch up your techniques. I know, you are a runner, so you just run. Why would you take a spin class, hot yoga, or strength train at a gym?  This goes back to the old saying: variety is the spice of life. Varying your fitness routine is essential to become a well-rounded runner. 

Here are four reasons why you should diversify your training and how to add a little ginger to your jog.
 

Achieve Results. Even if you are just looking to maintain your current fitness level, you can’t do it with the same old routine. Your body becomes efficient at your chosen exercise routine when it is repeated over and over. Your muscle memory decreases the amount of effort necessary and expended, thus decreasing your calorie burn. So, in this case, doing the same thing over and over again eventually will not have the same result! You must switch up the training by adding something new and cranking up the intensity. Go a little farther or a little faster on your run, or do both. Make one of your runs a tempo run.  Add-in some intervals or hill repeats. Pick one run a week and make that run longer, building by no more than 10% from week to week.  By adding any one or all three of these tips to your running routine, you will achieve new and improved results.
 

Muscle Activation. Running on different surfaces, or cycling, or even working out on the elliptical machine at your gym will activate a variety of new and different muscles. If your body is use to running on the treadmill, increase the incline or take a run through your local park. If you are a trail runner, try mountain biking. When you start to vary your terrain, add inclines and descents, cross-train, or even run in different shoes you increase your strength and activate muscles you may not be currently using. For example, swimming is a great full body workout with impact.  Believe it or not, upper body and core strength are important for a runner and swimming is a good way to help you achieve an all over strength gain. You can also incorporate strength or resistance training into your daily routine. This will make you stronger, fatigue less quickly and become more toned. After a strength training session, your body burns a lot of calories and needs additional energy to repair the muscle tissue just broken down, therefore, you will increase your metabolism. 
 

Fight Boredom – Stay Motivated. This step doesn’t require much explanation. Doing the same fitness routine over and over can get mighty tedious.  Diversifying your training will increase overall fitness level and will motivated you to run as well.
 

Reduce Chance of Injury. Running can lead to over-use injuries because of the repetitive nature of the sport and the impact of activity level on leg muscles and joints. Instead of engaging in running  multiple times during the week, hop on a bike or hit the pool. You’ll still get the aerobic workout, but you will be employing new muscles with less impact.

By Laura Ouimet, Dana Point Chamber of Commerce Executive Director, and a marathon/ triathlon coach and trainer. To learn more about the Dana Point Turkey Trot and to sign up, visit www.turkeytrot.com.